A Trick Of The Trade…

3 Aug

image
Over the years, I have been asked on several occasions to try and review different cosmetics. One of the big items I get many samples of is loose mineral eyeshadow. I put any samples I get into 5 gm sifter jars and arrange them in my makeup drawer usually from light to dark. I would easily say I have over 100 samples of different colors. I’m not proud of that. I will probably have enough to last me till I get to the nursing home someday, and then will have enough to trade for chocolate pudding on weekends.

Although I have tons of different colors of loose mineral eyeshadows, I’m sad to say I use very little of them. It’s not that I don’t like them. In fact I love them! They are natural, highly pigmented, long lasting shades that take very little to achieve a desired look. But here is the problem: they are messy. If I don’t make a mess with the powder falling off the brush, I then have to fight the mess of shadow fallout on my face and cheeks. That part is annoying. I’ve always tried to follow the rule: do your eye makeup first, but even then, some mineral shadow falls out and can’t be blended naturally into the skin when it comes time to prepare your face. Then a face cleanser wipe is needed to clean the entire face–minus the eyes–and the face routine must be redone. Annoying. Hassle. Bah.

During my recent Twitter surf, I might have found the answer to my loose mineral eyeshadow problems. I’d love to give credit to the original poster but it’s been around Twitterverse so long now, I’ve lost track of how it was mapped! So, I decided to just throw up this “How To” blog post so if you are like me, you can get a solid grip on these loose high pigment shadows without your bathroom counter looking looking like a powdery rainbow explosion.

What you will need:

  • Loose powder mineral eyeshadows in jars
  • Q-tips
  • Rubbing alcohol (70% Isopropyl Rubbing Alcohol is the best)
  • Small piece of Saran Wrap
  • Pressing pans & compacts (if desired)

image1. Take your loose mineral eye shadow and remove the sifter if there is one. Gently tap the container on a counter or table so all the shadow is even at the bottom. If you want to add or mix colors, do it now. Make sure after you add any new pigments, you replace the cap, shake to mix & tap to make it even again.

image2. Take the cotton off one end of the q-tip so all you have is the stick. CAREFULLY add a couple of drops of alcohol to the powder. You can do this with an eye dropper or by dunking the cotton end of the q-tip in the alcohol and squeezing the tip with your fingers so the drops go in the container.

image3. Mix the powder shadow/alcohol mixture with the stick end of the q-tip. If it’s very dry, thick or clumpy, add one drop of alcohol at a time till it becomes a thick but still smooth paste.

image4. If you want to put it in a shadow pan, use the q-tip to scrape it in. If you want to keep it in the jar, smooth it out as much as possible. Take the small piece of Saran Wrap and lay it over the shadow. Take a quarter (for a pan) or a bottom of a small tube, like a lipstick tube (for a jar) and press down a couple of times to pack it. Let it set with the weight on it for a minute or two.

image5. Remove the plastic wrap and check to see if it is packed and solid. If it’s still loose or clumpy, add another drop of alcohol and pack again. If it’s too watery, let the alcohol evaporate for 5-10 minutes then pack again to see if it hardens. (You could also add a bit more powder shadow to thicken it up a bit, leave the top off for 5-10 min. then repack again.). If it is a perfect solid shadow, then you did it!

image6. Leave the open jar or pan out in the air for 15-30 min to let any remaining alcohol “burn off”. Then take the finish product and either cap it if it’s in a jar or put the pan in a compact. Done, solid, no more mess! Your “new” solid eyeshadow is ready to use! Go play makeup!,

**NOTE** – Make sure the shadow is completely dry and packed before you use it. If it is the slightest bit creamy or “wet”, that means the alcohol hasn’t evaporated completely or you used too much and putting it near your eyes can cause burning and irritation. If you feel this happening, rinse your eye out with water and wait a while longer for the alcohol to evaporate. You can also add a bit more pigment powder in a similar shade to help thicken it and quicken the process.

The one thing I love about doing this is that I can blend various colors together to get unique shades. For example, tonight I combined a very light aqua blue, a bit of very dark blue sparkle and a bit of cream frost for a smoky peacock turquoise. SOOO pretty. My next challenge will be a deep maroon purple!

If you are looking for reasonably priced pans and pallets, the best place I’ve found is Stars Makeup Haven. They have all kinds of empty containers. Since my samples tend to be in small quantities, I’m leaving them in their 5 gm jars and just “solidifying” my favorites.

Enjoy mixing and creating! This is a great way to keep your favorite loose shadows ‘tight’ without a powdery mess in your drawers, purses, cases or bags! Try it and enjoy a new way to use natural mineral eyeshadows in a controlled, solid way!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s